Research
Grants

The Foundation aims to strengthen the role of the nursing and midwifery profession across the health system through the development of a research-driven, evidence-based platform of healthcare.

To achieve this, the Foundation is developing a comprehensive research funding strategy. The strategy will focus on advancing the discipline of nursing and midwifery and informing best practice care.

Key Dates

In May, 2021 we concluded the the most recent funding round for the Foundation. 

As you may have seen in previous correspondence and on our website, we had hoped to be offering a new round of funding this calendar year, however this is now being delayed until 2022.

We appreciate that researchers are extremely busy people who are already juggling multiple demands on their time. Therefore, we are also keen to improve the application process in order for this to be more streamlined and less onerous for researchers to apply for funding.

We are still developing the exact details but it likely that each round of funding will have a different research theme for which we will request expressions of interest. Research projects that we feel have a strong alignment with the Foundation will be asked to complete a full application.

Finally, we recognise the last 18 months has been a difficult time for the whole community, but COVID-19 has especially affected people working in the nursing, midwifery and aged care professions. This understandably has also had a significant impact on the researchers who are investigating ways to advance how nursing, midwifery and aged care is provided and ultimately improve the lives and wellbeing of the community.

The Board and Grants Committee continue to be both impressed and proud of the many incredible research projects happening across the country. You should feel proud of the work you do and the profession you continue to contribute to.

We look forward to continue working with you in 2022.

About the Grants

In the interest of ensuring that all Australians receive the best possible nursing and midwifery care, the Rosemary Bryant Foundation funds high quality, translatable research that can be readily adopted and embedded into practice.

Nurses and midwives represent nearly two-thirds of registered health practitioners in Australia. Through funding nursing and midwifery research, the Foundation aims to create a more informed and productive workforce that can provide optimal care to the community.

A key focus of any project funded by the Rosemary Bryant Foundation is that there is a leadership role for a nurse/midwife and there is demonstrable collaboration with nurses/midwives in relevant practice environments.

The Foundation also encourages established leaders in the field to support non-academic researchers (e.g. practising nurses/midwives), as well as early and mid-career researchers by including them as members of the research team in applications.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does nurse/midwife-led mean?

For the purposes of the Rosemary Bryant Foundation Grants, nurse/midwife-led means:

  • the research topic/question was conceived by a nurse/midwife as result of their work to resolve an issue they are facing or to explore an opportunity they have identified; and/or
  • the project clearly demonstrates that practising nurses/midwives have been consulted in the design of the research and are involved in the research team and/or
  • the Chief Researcher/co-leaders are nurses/midwives.

 

What academic level should the members of the research team be?

The research team members can be of any academic level. We also welcome research team members who are not from an academic background e.g. practising Nurses and Midwives. However, it is expected that at least one member of the research team has a demonstrable research background to ensure the scientific rigour of the project.

 

What academic level should the Chief Investigator be?

The Chief Investigator can be of any academic level. We also welcome applications where the Chief Investigator who are not from an academic background e.g. practising Nurses and Midwives. However, it is expected that at least one member of the research team has a demonstrable research background to ensure the scientific rigour of the project.

 

Do I need to have a PhD to be eligible to apply?

The Chief Investigator does not need a PhD to be eligible to apply for some grants. The qualifications and experience of the team must be commensurate with the needs of the project. It would be expected that applications for Discovery Grants would have investigators with PhD qualifications and substantial research records. Seeding grants, directed towards early career researchers, would not necessarily require a PhD preparation.

 

Do I need to be a nurse/midwife to apply?

No, the funding applicant need not be a nurse/midwife, but you need to be able to demonstrate that the project is nurse/midwife-led.

 

Do I need to include a literature review?

No, it is not expected for you to provide a literature review as part of your application.

 

Do I need to include a CV for everyone on the research team?

No, but as a minimum we require a CV (maximum of 5 pages) for the Chief Investigator. You are also able to provide additional CVs (maximum of 5 pages per CV) for other members of your research team if you wish.

 

Can the grants be used to pay for a research assistant?

Yes, you can include the costs for research assistance within the budget for your project. However, it should be noted that the salaries and/or on costs, in whole, or in part, for Chief Investigators cannot be included.

 

Can the grants be used to pay for a PhD student’s study costs?

No, the grants cannot be used to fund education or tuition fees.

Further Information

Should you have any enquiries regarding the grants please contact:

Megan Corlis
Foundation Manager
Rosemary Bryant Foundation
08 8178 4201
info@rbf.org.au